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Saturday, November 6, 2010

MEDICINAL PLANTS PICTURES IN AYURVEDA

MEDICINAL PLANTS PICTURES IN AYURVEDA


1.Moringa oleifera

Moringa oleifera 

Moringa oleifera, commonly referred to simply as "Moringa" (from Tamil: Murungai(முருங்கை) Kannada ನುಗ್ಗೆ ಕಾಯಿ Malayalam: ..


















2.Momordica_charantia

Name: Paval
Filename: Momordica_charantia.jpg
Description:
Botanical name : Momordica charantia Linn.
Family : Cucurbitaceae 
SANSKRIT SYNONYMS
Karavella
AYURVEDIC PROPERTIES 
Rasa    : Tikta, Katu, Kashaya 
Guna   : Lakhu, Rooksha
Virya   : Anushnaseeta

MEDICINAL PROPERTIES 
Plant pacifies vitiated pitta, kapha diabetes, skin disease, constipation, worm infestation, burning sensation, wound, ulcers, inflammation and general debility.  
Useful part : Whole plant.   















3.Cassia bracteata

Family: Fabaceae
Genus: Cassia 
Species: alata 
Synonym: Senna alata, Herpetica alata, Cassia bracteata, Cassia herpetica

TRIBAL AND HERBAL MEDICINE USES

The Tikuna Indians of the Amazon prepare a decocotion of the flowers as a purgative and one cup is taken each morning. In Cuba, the plant is named guacamaya francesa and it is used for herpes ulcers and other skin conditions, as a diuretic and as a laxative. In Peruvian herbal medicine systems the plant is called retama and the flowers are prepared in an infusion to treat urinary infections and used to increase urination; the leaves and stems are prepared in a decoction for acaries, herpes ulcers, ringworm, and other skin conditions; and, the root, leaves, wood and flowers are decocted for a remedy against intestinal parasites and hepatitis. Interestingly, the flowers are used as a diuretic (to increase urination), while the leaves are believe to be anti-diuretic. In Brazil, the plant is called guajava or mata-pasto. An infusion of the bark and roots is used for hydropsy, skin erruptions and fever. The leaves are considered an ememmagogue and diuretic and are prepared in extracts or capsules for liver problems, anemia, dyspepsia, menstrual problems, and high fevers. The leaves are juiced and mixed with lemon juice and applied to the skin for dematitis and taken internally for syphilis.

PLANT CHEMICALS

Guajava, like most Cassia and Senna plants, contain a group of chemicals called anthraquinones. These chemicals are well known for their laxative effect. Guajava leaves also contain a chemical called adenine which has been documented as an effective platelet aggregating inhibitor (reduces sticky blood and arterial plaque).

Other chemicals in guajava include chrysoeriol-7-O-(2"-O-beta-D-mannopyranosyl)-beta-D-allopyranoside, kaempferol, kaempferol 3-O-gentiobioside, naringenin, quercetin, and rhamnetin-3-O-(2"-O-beta-D-mannopyranosyl)-beta-D-allopyranoside.














4.Tabernaemontana divaricata

Name: Nandyarvattam
Filename: Tabernaemontana_divaricata.jpg

Description:

Botanical name : Tabernaemontana divaricata (Linn.) R.Br. ex Roem & Schultes  
Family : Apocynaceae 
SANSKRIT SYNONYMS
Nandeevriksha, Khsirika, Ksheeri, Vishnupriya
AYURVEDIC PROPERTIES 
Rasa    : Katu, Tikta
Guna   : Lakhu
Virya   : Seeta
Vipaka : Katu

MEDICINAL PROPERTIES 
Plant pacifies vitiated vata, pitta, diseases of the eye, headache, skin diseases, bleeding disorder, itching, and arthritis. 
Useful part : Root, Flowers, Latex.  



                                        










5.Aristolochia Indiaca

Botanical – Aristolochiaceae
Ayurvedic – ishwari kul
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Other Names
English : Indian birthwort
Hindi : Isvarmul, Isarmul
Kannada : Isvaverusa
Malayalam : Karalayam Isvaramulla, Karalakam, Garudakkoti
Sanskrit : Garalika, Isvari Tamil : Karutakkoti Isvaramuli
Telugu : Esvaraveru

According to ayurveda it contains
Gunna (properties) - laghu (light) and ruksh (dry)
Rasa (taste) – tickta (bitter), katu (pungent) and kashaya (astringent)
Virya (potency) – ushan (hot)

Indication

Poisoning
Arthritis
Inflammation
Indigestion
Heart related problems
Uterus related ailments
Fever
Dysurea
Skin diseases
Menstrual disturbances
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Uses

The root is pungent, bitter; alexiteric; emmenagogne; useful in "tridosha", pains in the joints, bowel troubles of children (Ayurveda). The seeds are tasteless; useful in inflammations, biliousness, dry cough, joint pains, dyspnoea of children; purgative. The plant is good for snake-bite(Yuani). The root, which is very bitter, is held in much esteem as a stimulant, tonic, and emmenagogue, and is employed in intermittent fevers and other affections. In Bombay, it is chiefly prescribed in the bowel complaints of children; and in cholera it is regarded as a stimulant tonic, and is also applied externally to the abdomen. The juice of the fresh leaves is very useful in the croup of children, by inducing vomiting, without causing any depression. The plant is used as an abortifacient. It is as an antidote to snake-bites, however, that it has obtained Most repute, and by the early Portuguese settlers was termed Raiz De Cobra, irom its supposed efficacy in those cases even in the bite of the Cobra de Capello. It seems to be, however, more used by the native Madras Physicians for snake-bite than in the Deccan or Konkan. In the Philippine Islands, the bitter nauseous root is the most popular remedy for poisonous bites and stings. It is largely used in intermittent fevers as an emmenagogue and tonic and is given to children for flatulence and in dyspepsia. It is recommended for all kinds of intestinal disorders. In Tamil country, the vaidyans use this drug in malarial {even. The juice of the leaves of the plant is said to be a specific antidote for cobra poisoning. The root is also used for the same purpose. The powdered root is given in honey for leucodenna. A decoction of the roots of this plant was given to cases of malarial fever, the result was unsatisfactory (Koman). The root, stem, and leaves are recommended for the treatment of snake-bite (Charaka, Vagbhata, Bapat, Ainslie, Rheede, Robeite) and scorpion-sting (Charaka); but they are all useless in (he antidotal and symptomatic treatment of snake-bite (Mhaskar and Caius) and scorpion-sting (Caius and Mhaskar).










6. Tamarind




amarind (Tamarindus indica) (from Latinization of Arabic: تمر هندي tamar Hind "Indian Date") is a tree in the family Fabaceae. The genus Tamarindus is monotypic (having only a single species)


Medicinal uses

Phytochemical studies revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, sesquiterpenes, alkaloids and phlobatamins and other extracts active against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria, at temperatures of 4–30 °C (39–86 °F). Studies on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the extracts on the test organisms showed that the lowest MIC and the MBC were demonstrated against Salmonella paratyphi, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi and the highest MIC and MBC was exhibited against Staphylococcus aureus.
Throughout Asia and Africa it is common for health remedies. In Northern Nigeria, fresh stem bark and fresh leaves are used as decoction mixed with potash for the treatment of stomach disorder, general body pain, jaundice, yellow fever and as blood tonic and skin cleanser. In Indonesia, Malaysia and Philippines and Javanese traditional medicine use asem leaves as a herbal infusion for malarial fever, the fruit juice as an anti-septic, and scurvy and even cough cure. Fruit of the tamarind is also commonly used throughout South East Asia as a poultice applied to foreheads of fever sufferers.
Tamarind is used as in Indian Ayurvedic Medicine for gastric and/or digestion problems, and in cardioprotective activity.
In animal studies, tamarind has been found to lower serum cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Due to a lack of available human clinical trials, there is insufficient evidence to recommend tamarind for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol) or diabetes.
Based on human study, tamarind intake may delay the progression of fluorosis enhancing excretion of fluoride. However, additional research is needed to confirm these results.
Excess consumption has been noted as a traditional laxative.
Other medicinal uses include: Anthelminthic (expels worms), antimicrobial, antiseptic, antiviral, asthma, astringent, bacterial skin infections (erysipelas), boils, chest pain, cholesterol metabolism disorders, colds, colic, conjunctivitis (pink eye), constipation (chronic or acute), diabetes, diarrhea (chronic), dry eyes, dysentery (severe diarrhea), eye inflammation, fever, food preservative, food uses (coloring), gallbladder disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, gingivitis, hemorrhoids, indigestion, insecticide, jaundice, keratitis (inflammation of the cornea), leprosy, liver disorders, nausea and vomiting (pregnancy-related), paralysis, poisoning (Datura plant), rash, rheumatism, saliva production, skin disinfectant/sterilization, sore throat, sores, sprains, sunscreen, sunstroke, swelling (joints), urinary stones, wound healing (corneal epithelium).















7. Vernonia


For the town, see Vernonia, Oregon.
Vernonia

Vernonia baldwinii
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Vernonieae
Genus: Vernonia
Schreb.
Species
About 1000; see text
Vernonia is a genus of about 1000 species of forbs and shrubs in the family Asteraceae. Some species are known as Ironweed. Some species are edible and of economic value. They are known for having intense purple flowers. The genus is named for English botanist William Vernon. There are numerous distinct subgenera and subsections in this genus. This has led some botanists to divide this large genus into smaller groups which separate the species into distinct genera. For instance, the Flora of North America only recognizes about 20 species, 17 of which are in North America or n. Mexico, with the other two or three being found in South America.




















8.Ramacham

Scientific name :Vetiveria zizanioides

Family :Poaceae

Habitat : Perennial grass

Medicinal Uses : Oil from roots is diaphoretic , stimulant and refrigerant . Used for colic , flatulence , and obstinate vomiting . Affords relief when appliec for rheumatism , lumbago and sprins . 













9.Kiriyath

Filename: Andrographis_paniculata.jpg
Description:
Botanical name : Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees
Family : Acanthaseae
SANSKRIT SYNONYMS
Kiratatikta, Kandatikta, Bhoonimba, Tiktaka
AYURVEDIC PROPERTIES 
Rasa    : Tikta
Guna   : Lakhu, Rooksha, 
Virya   : Ushna

MEDICINAL PROPERTIES 
Plant pacifies tridoshas, skin diseases, burning sensation, cough and bronchitis. Plant stimulates liver and purifies vitiated blood.
 Useful part : Whole plant 














10.Karuvapatta

Scientific Name : Cinnamomum zeylanicum

Family : Lauraceae

Habitat :Perennial tree

Medicinal uses : Karuvapatta is astringent , carminative , stimulant and checks nausea . Used in the treatment of asthma cough and checks formation of free radicals in the body 

















11.Cinnamomum camphora


For the Australian tree also known as Camphorwood, see Cinnamomum oliveri.
Camphor Laurel

An ancient camphor tree, estimated to be over 1000 years old, in Japan
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Magnoliids
Order: Laurales
Family: Lauraceae
Genus: Cinnamomum
Species: C. camphora
Binomial name
Cinnamomum camphora
(L.) Sieb.
Cinnamomum camphora (commonly known as Camphor tree, Camphorwood or camphor laurel) is a large evergreen tree that grows up to 20–30 metres tall. The leaves have a glossy, waxy appearance and smell of camphor when crushed. In spring it produces bright green foliage with masses of small white flowers. It produces clusters of black berry-like fruit around one centimetre in diameter. It has a pale bark that is very rough and fissured vertically.
Camphor is a white crystalline substance, obtained from the tree Cinnamomum camphora. Camphor has been used for many centuries as a culinary spice, a component of incense, and as a medicine. Camphor is also an insect repellent and a flea-killing substance.
Cinnamomum camphora is native to Taiwan, southern Japan, southeast China and Indochina, where it is also cultivated for camphor and timber production. The production and shipment of camphor, in a solid, waxy form, was a major industry in Taiwan prior to and during the Japanese colonial era (1895–1945). It was used medicinally and was also an important ingredient in the production of smokeless gunpowder and celluloid. Primitive stills were set up in the mountainous areas in which the tree is usually found. The wood was chipped; these chips were steamed in a retort, allowing the camphor to crystallize on the inside of a crystallization box, after the vapour had passed through a cooling chamber. It was then scraped off and packed out to government-run factories for processing and sale. Camphor was one of the most lucrative of several important government monopolies under the Japanese.




















12.HELIOTERES ISORA

Murudsheng (Murgshrung)

Scientific name: Helicteres isora 

Common name: Indian screw-fruit

Family: Sterculiaceae

Nature of Helicteres isora

it is a shurb growing around 1.8 meters in height.
the leaves are ovate in shape with a serrate margin.
flowers are bright orange-red in colour when young and turn blackish before fruiting. fruits in a pod, five together forming a screw like structure.

location: mostly this plant Found in moist and deciduous forests

Special characteristics of Helicteres isora 
Its orange red flowers and screw shaped fruits.

Medicinal uses of Helicteres isora 
Fruits used in treating intestinal complaints, colic pains and flatulence.
roots used in diabetes and in convulsions.



















13.ORTHOSIPHON STAMINEUS

Orthosiphon stamineus



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Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2006)
Orthosiphon stamineus

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Orthosiphon
Species: O. stamineus
Binomial name
Orthosiphon stamineus
Orthosiphon stamineus or Misai Kucing (Malay for "Cat's Whiskers") is a traditional herb that is widely grown in tropical areas. The two general species, Orthosiphon stamineus "purple" and Orthosiphon stamineus "white" are traditionally used to treat diabetes, kidney and urinary disorders, high blood pressure and bone or muscular pain.
Also known as Java tea, it was possibly introduced to the west in early 20th century. Misai Kucing is popularly consumed as a herbal tea. The brewing of Java tea is similar to that for other teas. It is soaked in hot boiling water for about three minutes, before being added with honey or milk. It can be easily prepared as garden tea from the dried leaves. There are quite a number of commercial products derived from Misai Kucing.
picture: Orthosiphon Stamineus (Misai Kucing)




















14.Madhuka


The Sanskrit name madhuka should not be confused with madhuka which means yastimadhu (Glycyrrhiza glabra), which is entirely a different plant. Madhuka is one of the herbs mentioned in all ancient scriptures of Ayurveda and has few synonyms like vanaprastha, svadupuspa, uksnasara, madhusrava, madhulaka, madhusthila, gudapuspa etc. The great sage Caraka has categorized it as cadsusya – beneficial for the eyes, purisa virajaniya – gives proper colour to the faeces and daha prasamana relieves burning sensation of the skin. Acarya Vagbhata has mentioned it as vajikarana – an aphrodisiac.

The plant grows in all the plains and lower hills of India up to 1200 meters, and is at certain places, a chief constituent of the forest vegetation. It is a large deciduous tree with rather shorter bole, but larger crown. It grows 13-16 meters in height, and bark grayish black, scaly. The leaves, 10-20 cm long, thick leathery, pointed at tip, with 10-12 prominent veins. The flowers strongly musk-scented, falling at dawn, fleshy, pale or dull white, in clusters near the ends of branches. The fruits, 2.5-5 cm long, ovoid berries, yellow when ripe. The tree blooms in the summer and bears fruits in rainy season.

The botanical name of madhuka is Madhuca longifolia (Synonym Madhuca India) and it belongs to family sapotaceae. The seeds contain 55% stable oil. From the flowers, liquor is obtained by distillation. Since centuries, the flowers are used in Ayurvedic Pharmacy in manufacturing various asavas and aristas (herbs, eigher in their fresh juice – arista, or their decoction – asava. From fruits, sucrose, sitosterol, a sterol glucoside from nuts, and amyrin acetate, capryloxyerythridiol and capryloxyoleanolic acid isolated. From the bark lupeol acetate, amyrin acetate, spinasterol, erythrodiol monocaprylate, betulinic acid and oleanolic acids caprylates, rhamnose, glucose and galactose isolated. Polysaccharides PS – AI & PS- A II, isolated from flowers, constitute galactose, glucose, arabinose and glucoronic acid.

Properties
Madhuka is sweet in taste, sweet in the post digestive effect and has cold potency. It alleviates vata and pitta doshas. It possesses heavy and oily (snigdha) attributes. The dried flowers have hot potency. The fruits alleviate kapha and vata doshas. It has anabolic and rejuvenative properties and is used in diseases like tuberculosis, blood diseases, asthma, burning sensation and thirst.

Uses
The flowers, seeds and seed oil of madhuka have great medicinal value. Externally, the seed oil massage is very effective to alleviate pain. In skin diseases, the juice of flowers is rubbed for oleation. It is also beneficial as a nasya (nasal drops) in diseases of the head due to pitta, like sinusitis. The seed oil is used in manufacturing of soaps and is used as an edible also.

Internally, madhuka is used in vast range of diseases. The decoction of the flowers is a valuable remedy for pitta diseases. As a general tonic, the powder of flowers works well with ghee and honey. The decoction of flowers quenches the thirst effectively. Because of its astringent property, madhukarista is salutary in diarrhea and colitis. In raktapitta, the fresh juice of flowers is used with great benefit to arrest the bleeding. The flowers play an important role in augmention the breast milk in lactating mothers and in boosting the quantity of seminal fluids also. Madhuka is benedicial in urinary ailments like burning micturition and dehydration, fever, tuberculosis etc. The combination of the powders of the bark skin of madhuka, pippali and marica fruits, rhizomes of vaca and salt in equal parts is used in the form of nasal drops, in the treatment of epilepsy, with excellent benefit. Madhuka is the best nervine and salutary in the diseases due to vata. The nasya-nasal therapy is useful in hysteria, cough and sinusitis. The bark skin powder is given along with ghee and honey to improve the vitality and sexual vigor.


















15.IPOMOEA PANICUNLATA



Biological Name: Ipomoea paniculata, Ipomoea mauritiana, Ipomoea digitata
Family: Convolvulaceae
Other Names: Bilai-kand, Vidari-kanda, Balaikand, Bhumikusmanda, Palmudukan kizhangu
Additional Info: The plant is indigenous to India.
Elements Applied: Tuber is applied in herbal medicine.
Used For: The remedy is effective due to its ability to boost urination, rejuvenate the system, stimulate the digestive system, induce menstruation and lactation, bile movement, boost sexual desire, and increase metabolic rates.
The list of conditions treated by Vidari-kanda includes: tuberculosis, weak digestion, menstrual irregularities, low weight, spleen and liver inflammations, lack of breast milk, and debility.






16.PTEROCARPUS MARSUPIUM

Pterocarpus marsupium



Pterocarpus marsupium

Conservation status

Vulnerable (IUCN 2.3)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Tribe: Dalbergieae
Genus: Pterocarpus
Species: P. marsupium
Binomial name
Pterocarpus marsupium
Roxburgh
Pterocarpus marsupium, or the Indian Kino Tree is a medium to large, deciduous tree that can grow up to 30 metres tall. It is native to India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, where it occurs in parts of the Western Ghats in the Karnataka-Kerala region. It is also known by the names Malabar Kino, Benga, Bijiayasal (in western Nepal), Piasal (Oriya, Venkai, and many others.

Uses

Parts of the Indian Kino (heart wood, leaves, flowers) have long been used for their medicinal properties in Ayurveda. The heart wood is used as an astringent and in the treatment of inflammation and diabetes.
Similipal Kol tribes in Orissa, India pound a paste mixure of the bark of P. marsupium with the barks of Mangifera indica, Shorea robusta and Spondias pinnata to treat some dysentery illnesses. Also known as Honne or Kempu Honne in Kannada.


















                                                      
17.SYZYGIUM CUMINI


Jambul


This article is about the tropical tree. For the dessert popular in South Asian cuisine, see Gulab Jamun.
Jambul

Jambul (Syzygium cumini)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Syzygium
Species: S. cumini
Binomial name
Syzygium cumini
(L.) Skeels.
Jambul (Syzygium cumini) is an evergreen tropical tree in the flowering plant family Myrtaceae, native to Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Indonesia. The word 'Jambul' is sometimes mistranslated as 'Blackberry', which is a different fruit.
Jambul is also known as Jaam/Kalojaam, Jamun, Nerale Hannu, Naval pazham,Neredupandu, Jamblang, Jambolan, Jambula, Black Plum, Damson Plum, Duhat Plum, Jambolan Plum, Java Plum or Portuguese Plum. "Malabar plum" may also refer to other species of Syzygium.
Historically, the tree was exclusive to the Indian Sub-continent, and so widespread across the region that one of the old names of India (or the Indian region) is Jambu-Dvipa (literally: the island of jambul fruit). It is now also grown in other areas of southern and southeastern Asia including the Philippines, Myanmar, and Afghanistan. The tree was also introduced to Florida, USA in 1911 by the USDA, and is also now commonly grown in Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. In Brazil, where it was introduced from India during Portuguese colonization, it has dispersed spontaneously in the wild in some places, as its fruits are eagerly sought by various native birds such as thrushes, tanagers and the Great Kiskadee. This species is considered an invasive in Hawaii, USA, where it is known as Java Plum.




















18.PUNICA GRANATUM

Pomegranate

Not to be confused with permanganate.
Pomegranate

A pomegranate
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Subclass: Rosidae
Order: Myrtales
Family: Lythraceae
Genus: Punica
Species: P. granatum
Binomial name
Punica granatum
L.
Synonyms
Punica malus
Linnaeus, 1758
A pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing to between five and eight meters tall. Native to the drier regions of the Mediterranean Basin, pomegranate is widely cultivated throughout India and parts of southeast Asia, Malaya, the East Indies and tropical Africa. Introduced into Latin America and California by Spanish settlers in 1769, pomegranate is now cultivated in parts of California and Arizona for juice production.
In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruit is typically in season from September to February.In the Southern Hemisphere, it is in season from March to May.
An ancient fruit, pomegranate is mentioned in Europe as early as the Iron-Age Greek Mythology in the Homeric hymns. Yet, it has still to reach mainstream prominence as a consumer fruit in commercial markets of North America and the Western Hemisphere.














19.WOODFORDIA FRUITICASA

Woodfordia Fruticosa

Botanical Name : Woodfordia Fruticosa
Family Name : Lythaceae
Common Name : Fire-flame Bush, Shinajitea, Woodfordia
Part Used : Flowers
Habitat : Throughout india but abundantly found in north india upto 1600 m.
Product offered : Flowers
Uses : The flowers are acrid, astringent, styptic, depurative, utreine sadative, constipating, antibacterial, corrective of urinary pigments, febrifuge and alexeteric. They are useful in the conditions of kapha and pitta, leprosy, burning sensation, skindiseases, diarrhoea, dysentery, fever, headache, hemorrhoids, herpes, internal hemorrhage, leukorrhea, liver disorders, menorrhagia, ulcers, wounds. Juice of leaves are used in bilious sickness. They are also valued as a stimulant in pregnancy. Dried flower powder is used in ulcers and wounds to reduce the discharge and promote granulation.
The juice of its fresh flowers applied on the forehead, reduces the headache.



















20.MONOCHORIA VAGINALIS


Monochoria vaginalis



Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Commelinales
Family: Pontederiaceae
Genus: Monochoria
Species: M. vaginalis
Binomial name
Monochoria vaginalis
(Burm.f.) C.Presl ex Kunth
Monochoria vaginalis is a species of flowering plant in the water hyacinth family known by several common names, including heartleaf false pickerelweed and oval-leafed pondweed. It is native to much of Asia and across many of the Pacific Islands, and it is known in other areas as an introduced species and often a noxious weed. An aquatic plant, it is invasive in rice paddies and other water bodies. This is an annual or perennial herb growing in water from a small rhizome. It is quite variable in morphology. The shiny green leaves are up to about 12 centimeters long and 10 wide and are borne on rigid, hollow petioles. The inflorescence bears 3 to 25 flowers which open underwater and all around the same time. Each has six purple-blue tepals just over a centimeter long. The fruit is a capsule about a centimeter long which contains many tiny winged seeds

















21.ICHONOCARPUS FRUITICASA


















22.RANDIA DUMETORUM

Botanical Name: Randia dumetorum
Sanskrit Name: Madana, Vamanaphala, Teevragandhi
English Name: Emetic nut
Family: Rubiaceae

Plant Part Used: Fruits, Bark.

Description of Randia dumetorum:

A large deciduous thorny shrub grows up to 5 meters of height. Leaves simple, obovate, wrinkled, shiny and pubescent. Flowers white, fragrant, solitary, seen on at the end of short branches. Fruits globose, smooth berries with longitudinal ribs; yellow when ripe. Seeds many, compressed, embedded in the dark fetid pulp.



Medicinal Uses:

Plant pacifies cough, skin diseases, ulcers, asthma, flatulence, colic, and is widely used as a medicine for emesis therapy in ayurveda.




















23.VETIVERIA ZIZANOIDES

Usira is one of the best refrigerant herbs that cools and calms the entire body and mind, with its influence spreading throughout the circulatory, digestive, reparatory, and urinary and nervous systems. It enjoys an important place among medicinal herbs in India since ancient times. The great sage Charka has categorized it as varnya – complexion improving herb, dahaprasamana – refrige rant, angamarda prasamana – relieves body pains, chardi nigrahana – anti – emetic, stanya janana- galactogogue and svedapanayana- alleviates the excessive sweating. It has been cited also to be jvaraghna – anti- pyretic, pacana- digestant, trsnaghna- relieves the thirst and raktapittahara- mitigates blood diathesis (Madhava Nidana).

The plant grows all over India, and is also cultivated, in the plains and lower hills up to 1200 meters elevation. The commercial importance of roots is confirmed from the incidence of leving duty on vetiver roots by the king of Kannauj in 12 th century. It is a densely tufted perennial grass, with aromatic roots and rhizomes. The leaves are narrow, linear, 25-50 long and 1 cm broad, erect with compressed sheaths. The flowers grey, purplish, in slender racemes 10-30 cm in length. The fruits are oblong grains; the roots are hairy and aromatic. The plant grows 1-1.5 meters in height and flowers in June.

The botanical name of usira is Vetiveria zizanioides and it belongs to family Graminae / Poaceae. A volatile oil resins, coloring agents, iron oxide and lime salts have isolated from the plant. Khusimal, zizanol and isovalesenol are isolated from essential oil together with a new sequiterpene alcohol (I) which was characterized. A new epoxy alchoholkhusinol oxide-isolated from oil and its structure established Cyclopacamphenol, epicyclocopacamphenol, vetiselinenol and zizanol isolated and their structures elucidated Tetrahedron

Properties
Usira is bitter and sweet in taste, pungent in the post digestive effect and has cold potency. It alleviates pitta and kapha doshas, but aggravates the vata dosha. Usira possesses light and dry attributes. As it is fragrant, is deodorant. It is also diuretic and a rejuvenative. It alleviates the blood diseases, excessive thirst, dysuria, fever, skin disorders and the burning sensation of the body (Kaiyadeva Nighantu)

Uses
The roots of usira have great medicinal value and are used for medicinal purpose. It is used both, internally as well as externally. The paste of usira and sandal wood is applied on skin, in burning sensation. In prickly heat, the paste of usira, coriander fruit and musta is applied with benefit. The paste of usira roots is applied by itself to alleviate the burning sensation, excessive sweating and foul body smell. It is also beneficial in various skin ailments to improve the complexion of the skin. Usually, the thin paste of its roots is applied in summer season, to pacify the vitiated pitta. To control the excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis), it is used externally and internally also. Orally, the fine powder of its roots, approximately 2-3 grams, is given with rock candy and milk. It ameliorates the burning sensation of the body.

Internally, usira is useful in various diseases. Because of its bitter taste, it is an appetizer and digestant, and cold potency aids in alleviating vomiting, excessive thirst and also arrests bleeding. Hence, it is benevolent in treating anorexia, dyspepsia, thirst, vomiting and diarrhea. It also destroys ama, so effectively used in diarrhea of pitta type. The decoction of usira, musta, dhanyaka, bilva, lajjalu, dhataki, lodhra and sunthi is given with honey to mitigate diarrhea associated with the fever and bleeding. It is also effective to treat colitis due to vitiated pitta. The cold infusion works well to control vomiting. The root powder of usira, combined with honey, relieves the phlegm and so used in asthma, coughs and hiccup. In such conditions, the smoking of usira root powder in a form of cigarette is often recommended. Sadangodaka is beneficial to quench the thirst. Usira is a valuable blood purifier, destroys ama and toxins. To alleviate the burning sensation, it works well with sugar. In the bleeding disorders, Rakta pitta, the decoction of usira, chandana for better results.

It also serves to strengthen the nerves and imparts a pacifying effect on brain in nervine debility due to pitta. In hysteria, unconsciousness and chronic alcoholism, the decoction of usira, jatamansi and parpata is used with benefit. Usira alleviates the vitiation of pitta and works well a lactodepurant and galactogogue. The cold infusion with sugar imparts a diuretic action and alleviates dysuria of pitta type. Many a times, the decoction of the roots of usira, iksu and darbha alongwith raktacandana is of special benefit in dysuria. The general burning sensation of the body is tackled, by giving the misture of usira, rose petals, karcura and rock candy alongwith the milk. The cardiac pan is said to get relieved with the mixture of usira and pimpala mula, when given along with ghee.

The cold infusion or decoction of usira and patha is commonly recommended in treating fever. In treating erysipelas, the decoction of usira, amalaki, sariva and musta is very effective. (Ashtaang Hridya, chikitsa sthana. The bleeding per rectum and anal canal in Rakta pitta is controlled by the milk, medicated with usira, kamala and sunthi.



















24.OROXYLUM INDICUM 

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otanical classification
kingdom
Plantae
Division
Magnoliophyta
Class
Magnoliopsida
Order
solamaceae
Family
bignoniaceae
Genus
Oroxylum
Species
indicum
Oroxylum indicum
   
Family

Botanical – bignoniaceae
Ayurvedic –shayonak kul
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Synonyms
Hindi name –sonpatha
Sanskrit name- shayonak
Gujarati name – tentu


Chemical Constituents

Its root and stem contains three flavones named oroxylin A, baicalein and chrysin. Besides this it contains certain alkaloids, tannic acid, sitasterol and glactose. Seeds contain shiny oil that is 20 %.
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Pharmacology

It is vata and kapha suppressant. It helps in reducing pain and inflammation due to its hot potency. It also helps in improving the skin texture and promotes healing of wounds. It regularizes the digestion and prevents diarrhea. It is also very effective in worms and infection. It regulates the respiratory tract. And also tones up the urinary tract. It also helps in strengthening the whole body.
According to ayurveda it contains
Gunna (properties) – laghu (light), tikshan (sharp) and ruksha (dry)
Rasa (taste) – madhur (sweet), tickta (bitter) and
Virya (potency) – ushan (hot)





















25.SOLANUM TORVNM

Randia dumetorum

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otanical classification
kingdom
Plantae
Division
Magnoliophyta
Class
Magnoliopsida
Order
solamaceae
Family
bignoniaceae
Genus
Oroxylum
Species
indicum
Oroxylum indicum
   
Family

Botanical – bignoniaceae
Ayurvedic –shayonak kul
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Synonyms
Hindi name –sonpatha
Sanskrit name- shayonak
Gujarati name – tentu


Chemical Constituents

Its root and stem contains three flavones named oroxylin A, baicalein and chrysin. Besides this it contains certain alkaloids, tannic acid, sitasterol and glactose. Seeds contain shiny oil that is 20 %.
Go To Top

Pharmacology

It is vata and kapha suppressant. It helps in reducing pain and inflammation due to its hot potency. It also helps in improving the skin texture and promotes healing of wounds. It regularizes the digestion and prevents diarrhea. It is also very effective in worms and infection. It regulates the respiratory tract. And also tones up the urinary tract. It also helps in strengthening the whole body.
According to ayurveda it contains
Gunna (properties) – laghu (light), tikshan (sharp) and ruksha (dry)
Rasa (taste) – madhur (sweet), tickta (bitter) and
Virya (potency) – ushan (hot)
























26.COSTUS SPECIOSUS

Costus speciosus



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Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. 
Crape Ginger

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Zingiberales
Family: Costaceae
Genus: Costus
Species: C. speciosus
Binomial name
Costus speciosus
(J.Konig) Sm.
Costus speciosus or crape ginger is possibly the best known cultivated species of the genus Costus. This plant is native to southeast Asia, especially on the Greater Sunda Islands in Indonesia. Costus differs from the common ginger by having only one row of spirally arranged leaves.
The species reproduces vegetatively by rhizome and birds disperse seeds when they feed on the fruits.
While it is native to many Pacific Islands, it is an introduced invasive species on others, including the Cook Islands, Fiji, and Hawaii. It is cultivated in India for its medicinal uses and elsewhere as an ornamental.
The plant has many historical uses in Ayurveda, where the rhizome has been used to treat fever, rash, asthma, bronchitis, and intestinal worms. It is mentioned in the Kama Sutra as an ingredient in a cosmetic to be used on the eyelashes to increase sexual attractiveness.
C. speciosus has a large number of common names in many languages, including isebsab (Palauan), keukand (Hindi), pakarmula (Gujarati), pushkarmula (Marathi and Sanskrit),Jom Lakhuti (Assamese) and kostam (Tamil).






















27.CRATAEVA NURVALA

Plant Constituents of Crataeva Nurvala

Contains:

flavonoids
glucosinolates
plant sterols, including lupeol
saponins
tannins

Action:

anti-inflammatory [an agent to ease inflammation]
antilithic [an agent which reduces or suppresses urinary calculi (stones) and dissolves those already present]

Usage Crataeva Nurvala

Medicinal Parts Used: Bark or root bark

Crataeva nurvala is used for:

Genitourinary Conditions

atonic bladder (lack of normal tone)
benign prostatic hyperplasia (increase in volume of a tissue or organ caused by the formation of and growth of new cells) [usually combined with Pygeum]
bladder tonic
chronic urinary tract infections
hypotonic bladder (reduced tone or tension) and 
incontinence and possibly enuresis (bedwetting)
prevention and treatment of kidney stones
Dosage:

5-10 mL/day 1:2 liquid herbal extract
15-25 g/day decoction of dried bark or root bark

















28.ALBIZIA LEBBECK

Albizia lebbeck



"Mimosa speciosa" redirects here. As described by Nikolaus Joseph von Jacquin this refers to the Lebbeck. The Mimosa speciosa of Carl Peter Thunberg, however, is Albizia julibrissin.

Albizia lebbeck

Conservation status
Not evaluated (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Subclass: Rosidae
(unranked): Eurosids I
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Mimosoideae
Tribe: Ingeae
Genus: Albizia
Species: A. lebbeck
Binomial name
Albizia lebbeck
(L.) Benth.
Synonyms
Many, see text
Albizia lebbeck (शिरीष) is a species of Albizia, native to tropical southern Asia, and widely cultivated and naturalised in other tropical and subtropical regions. English names for it include Lebbeck, Lebbek Tree, Flea Tree, Frywood, Koko and Woman's tongues Tree. The latter name is a play on the sound the seeds make as they rattle inside the pods. Being one of the most widespread and common species of Albizia worldwide, it is often simply called "siris" though this name may refer to any locally common member of the genus.
It is a tree growing to a height of 18-30 m tall with a trunk 50 cm to 1 m in diameter. The leaves are bipinnate, 7.5–15 cm long, with one to four pairs of pinnae, each pinna with 6–18 leaflets. The flowers are white, with numerous 2.5–3.8 cm long stamens, and very fragrant. The fruit is a pod 15-30 cm long and 2.5-5.0 cm broad, containing six to twelve seeds.
Uses

Its uses include environmental management, forage, medicine and wood. It is cultivated as a shade tree in North and South America. In India, the tree is used to produce timber. Wood from Albizia lebbeck has a density of 0.55-0.66 g/cm3 or higher.
Even where it is not native, some indigenous herbivores are liable to utilize Lebbeck as a food resource. For example, the Greater Rhea (Rhea americana) has been observed feeding on it in the cerrado of Brazil.
It is also used as an extract in a supposed cure for insufficient male sexual organ size 
Pharmacology
Lebbeck is used as an astringent, to treat boils, cough, to treat the eye, flu, gingivitis, lung problems, pectoral problems, is used as a tonic, and is used to treat abdominal tumors. The bark is used medicinally to treat inflammation Albizia lebbeck is also psychoactive
























29.RIVINIA HUMILIS

Rivina humilis


"Pigeonberry" redirects here. It may also refer to the shrub Duranta erecta.
Rivina humilis

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Phytolaccaceae
Genus: Rivina
Species: R. humilis
Binomial name
Rivina humilis
L.
Synonyms
Rivina laevis L.
Rivina humilis is a species of flowering plant in the pokeweed family, Phytolaccaceae, that is native to the Americas. It can be found in the southern United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and tropical South America. Common names include Pigeonberry, Rouge Plant, Baby Peppers,Bloodberry, and Coralito.The specific name means "dwarfish" or "lowly" in Latin, referring to the plant's short stature.

Uses

Pigeonberry is cultivated as an ornamental in warm regions throughout the world and is valued as a shade-tolerant groundcover. It is also grown as a houseplant and in greenhouses.Juice made from the berries was used as a dye and ink at one time. The berries contain a pigment known as Rivianin or Rivinianin,which has the IUPAC name 5-O-β-D-Glucopyranoside, 3-sulfate, CAS number 58115-21-2, and molecular formula C24H26N2O16S. It is very similar to betanin, the pigment found in beets.





















30.JATROPA MUTIFIDA



Description

Coral plant is a shrub or small tree with a single trunk, a loose, spreading crown and a typical height in cultivation of 6-10 ft (1.8-3.1 m), although it can grow up to 20 ft (6.1 m) tall. The very distinctive leaves are large, growing up to 12 in (30.5 cm) wide. They are cut deeply into 7-11 narrow lobes with the margins of each lobe themselves dissected into narrow pointed segments. They are dark green above and whitish beneath. The flowers are bright coral red and borne in flat-topped clusters on long stalks held high above the foliage. Coral plant blooms on and off all year long, and especially during hot weather. Most euphorbs have a milky sap that flows from broken stems, but that of coral plant looks more like cloudy water.


Usage
Coral plant is grown for its distinctive large leaves and its flashy red flowers. This is a perfect container plant for a sunny patio or at poolside. The leaves have a strange and unusual tropical look, and coral plant is often grown as a novelty specimen or accent. It is also a welcome shrub in mixed shrub borders and often used in cactus and succulent gardens.


























31.PIPER BRACHYSTACHYUM

Name: Piper brachystachyum
Filename: Piper_brachystachyum.jpg
Description:
Botanical name : Piper brachystachyum Wall.
Family : Piperaceae
SANSKRIT SYNONYMS
Chavya, Chavika, Vanamaricha, Aranyamaricha
AYURVEDIC PROPERTIES 
Rasa    : Katu, Tikta
Guna   : Lakhu, Teekshna
Virya   : Ushna

MEDICINAL PROPERTIES 
Plant pacifies vitiated kapha pitta, cough, asthma, bronchitis, indigestion, dyspepsia, and anorexia
Useful part : Root, Fruit.  























32.PIMENTA DIOICA



Allspice

Allspice
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Pimenta
Species: P. dioica
Binomial name
Pimenta dioica
(L.) Merr.
Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper, kurundu, myrtle pepper, pimenta,or newspice is a spice which is the dried unripe fruit ("berries") of Pimenta dioica , a mid-canopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world. The name "allspice" was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves.
Several unrelated fragrant shrubs are called "Carolina allspice" (Calycanthus floridus), "Japanese allspice" (Chimonathus fragrans) or "Wild allspice" (Lindera benzoin). Allspice is also sometimes used to refer to the herb Costmary (Tanacetum balsamita).























33.ANNONA SQUAMOSA


Annona squamosa


Annona squamosa


Sugar-apple
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Magnoliids
Order: Magnoliales
Family: Annonaceae
Genus: Annona
Species: A. squamosa
Binomial name
Annona squamosa
L.
Synonyms
Annona asiatica L.
Annona cinerea Dunal
Guanabanus squamosus (L.)M.Gómez Xylopia frutescens
Xylopia glabra L.
Annona biflora Moç & Sessé
Annona forskahlii DC.
Annona squamosa a small well-branched tree or shrub that bears edible fruits called sugar-apple, species of the genus Annona and member of the family Annonaceae more willing to grow at lower altitudes than its relatives Annona reticulata and Annona cherimola (whose fruits often share the same name) making it the most widely cultivated of these species.

Common names

Indonesian: srikaya, serikaya, buah nona
English: custard-apple, sugar-apple, sweetsop
French: annone écailleuse, pomme-cannelle, Cachiman cannelle, Pomme cannelle
German: Rahmapfel, Süßsack, Schuppenannone, Zuckerapfel
Portuguese: Atá, fruta-do-conde, pinha, Ateira, Cabeça-de-negro, condessa, Coração-de-boi, Fruta da condessa, Fruta de condessa, Fruta do conde, Fruteira de conde, Pinha da Bahia, Pinheira, Pinha do sertão
Spanish: anón, anona blanca, chirimoyo, fruta del conde, Ahate, Anón candonga, Anona, Anona blanca, Anona de Castilla, Anona de Guatemala, Chirimoya, Chirimoya verrugosa, Mocuyo, Rinón
Kannada: ಸೀತಾಫಲ
Chinese: 番荔枝
Dutch: Kaneelappel
Japanese: バンレイシ
Tamil: சீதாப்பழம் (seetha pazham)
Thai: น้อยหน่า
Māori: katara‘āpa Māori, kātara‘apa Māori, naponapo, tapotapo, tapotapo Māori
Chamorro: ates, atis
Tahitian: tapo tapo, tapotapo
Tongan: ‘apele papalangi
Vietnamese: na (in the North), mãng cầu (in the South)
Hindi: सीताफल
Hebrew: אנונה‎
Arabic: قشدة حرشفية‎
Persian: آنونا اسکوآموزا
Fijian: Seremiya, Seremaia, Heremaia
Tagalog: Ates, Atis
Telugu: సీత ఫలం,(seetha phalam)
Māori: katara‘āpa Māori, kātara‘apa Māori, naponapo, tapotapo, tapotapo Māori
Chamorro: ates, atis
Tahitian: tapo tapo, tapotapo
Tongan: ‘apele papalangi
























34.TABERNAEMONTANA CORONAARIA

Scientific Name : Tabernaemontana coronaria
Family : Apocynaceae
Common Name : Tagar

A big shrub with glossy leaves. This plant is drought resistant. Some semi-double & variegated varieties are available.

Propagation : Stem cuttings
Longevity : Perennial





















35.NARVELIA ZEYLANICA

Name: Naravelia zeylanica
Filename: Naravelia_zeylanica.jpg
Description:
Botanical name : Naravelia zeylanica  (Linn.) DC.  
Family : Ranunculaceae 
SANSKRIT SYNONYMS
Dhanavalli, Vatanasini. 
AYURVEDIC PROPERTIES 
Rasa    : Kashaya, Tikta, Madhura
Guna   : Guru, Snigdha
Virya   : Samaseetoshna

MEDICINAL PROPERTIES 
Plant pacifies vitiated vata, pitta, inflammation, skin diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, arthritis, headache, colic, wounds and ulcers.
Useful part : Whole plant  

















36.PHYSALIS MINIRNA


















37.INDIGOFERA TINCTORIA

Indigofera tinctoria




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Indigofera tinctoria

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Tribe: Indigofereae
Genus: Indigofera
Species: I. tinctoria
Binomial name
Indigofera tinctoria
L.
Indigofera tinctoria bears the common name True indigo. The plant was one of the original sources of indigo dye. It has been naturalized to tropical and temperate Asia, as well as parts of Africa, but its native habitat is unknown since it has been in cultivation worldwide for many centuries. Today most dye is synthetic, but dye from I. tinctoria is still available, marketed as natural coloring. The plant is also widely grown as a soil-improving groundcover.
True indigo is a shrub one to two meters high. It may be an annual, biennial, or perennial, depending on the climate in which it is grown. It has light green pinnate leaves and sheafs of pink or violet flowers. The plant is a legume, so it is rotated into fields to improve the soil in the same way that other legume crops such as alfalfa and beans are.
Dye is obtained from the processing of the plant's leaves. They are soaked in water and fermented in order to convert the glycoside indican naturally present in the plant to the blue dye indigotin. The precipitate from the fermented leaf solution is mixed with a strong base such as lye, pressed into cakes, dried, and powdered. The powder is then mixed with various other substances to produce different shades of blue and purple.


























39.ALANGIUM SALVIFOLIUM

Botanical Name
:
Alangium salvifolium Wang
English Name
:
Sage-leaved alangium
Synonym(s)
:
Alangium lamarckii Thw.
Family
:
Alangiaceae


Herb Effects
Laxative, astringent, pungent, anthelmintic, purgative and emetic (root 
bark); alleviates spasms, antiprotozoal and hypoglycemic (leaf).

























40.SPONDIAS MANGIFERA




Synonym of Spondias pinnata (J. Koenig ex L. f.) Kurz

Genus: Spondias
Family: Anacardiaceae























41.IXORA COCCINEA 
Ixora coccinea



This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations where appropriate. (February 2010)
Ixora coccinea

Ixora coccinea
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Gentianales
Family: Rubiaceae
Genus: Ixora
Species: I. coccinea
Binomial name
Ixora coccinea
L.
Ixora coccinea, known as the Jungle Geranium, Flame of the Woods, and Jungle Flame, is a common flowering shrub native to Asia. Its name derives from an Indian deity. Although there are some 400 species in the genus Ixora, only a handful are commonly cultivated, and the common name, Ixora, is usually used for I. coccinea. I. coccinea is a dense, multi-branched evergreen shrub, commonly 4–6 ft (1.2–2 m) in height, but capable of reaching up to 12 ft (3.6 m) high. It has a rounded form, with a spread that may exceed its height. The glossy, leathery, oblong leaves are about 4 in (10 cm) long, with entire margins, and are carried in opposite pairs or whorled on the stems. Small tubular, scarlet flowers in dense rounded clusters 2-5 in (5–13 cm) across are produced almost all year long. There are numerous named cultivars differing in flower colour (yellow, pink, orange) and plant size. Several popular cultivars are dwarfs, usually staying under 3 ft (1 m) in height. Ixora 'Nora Grant' is a popular dwarf and 'Super King' is a popular hybrid with much larger flower clusters than the species.
I. coccinea is native to tropical south-east Asia, including Southern India and Sri Lanka. It has become one of the most popular flowering shrubs in South Florida gardens and landscapes.


























42.COSTUS SPECIOSUS
 Costus speciosus



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Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2010)
Crape Ginger

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Zingiberales
Family: Costaceae
Genus: Costus
Species: C. speciosus
Binomial name
Costus speciosus
(J.Konig) Sm.
Costus speciosus or crape ginger is possibly the best known cultivated species of the genus Costus. This plant is native to southeast Asia, especially on the Greater Sunda Islands in Indonesia. Costus differs from the common ginger by having only one row of spirally arranged leaves.
The species reproduces vegetatively by rhizome and birds disperse seeds when they feed on the fruits.
While it is native to many Pacific Islands, it is an introduced invasive species on others, including the Cook Islands, Fiji, and Hawaii. It is cultivated in India for its medicinal uses and elsewhere as an ornamental.
The plant has many historical uses in Ayurveda, where the rhizome has been used to treat fever, rash, asthma, bronchitis, and intestinal worms. It is mentioned in the Kama Sutra as an ingredient in a cosmetic to be used on the eyelashes to increase sexual attractiveness.
C. speciosus has a large number of common names in many languages, including isebsab (Palauan), keukand (Hindi), pakarmula (Gujarati), pushkarmula (Marathi and Sanskrit),Jom Lakhuti (Assamese) and kostam (Tamil).





FURTHER REFERENCE VISIT




2. Flowers of  India


















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I am Dr.Pouse Poulose completed my B.A.M.S from Vaidyaratnam Ayurveda Medical College,Thrissur on 2009 and now I am doing my P.G in Shalya Tantra M.S (Ay) at Alvas Ayurvedic Medical College,Moodbidri.I am the Sishya of Ashtavaidyan Alathiyoor Narayanan Nambi,he is my great guru its through him I know the true ayurvedic science and treatment.My aim is to spread maximum information's in ayurvedic science throughout this word because I know the greatness of this divine science from my experience and from my great teachers.I have done online consultation for thousands of patient world wide through my blog.If you want to get my Online Ayurvedic Consultation and Advice for your disease condition contact me through my e-mail with your entire disease detail as per the Consultation Form I have given in my blog to pousepoulose@gmail.com

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